Google-funded drones to hunt rhino poacher, WWF deploys in Nepalese national park

No, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is not using drones to vaporize poachers. But thanks to a five million dollar grant awarded by Google on Tuesday, the organization is expanding its use of unmanned aerial vehicles to track and deter criminals who illegally hunt endangered animal species around the world.

WWF spokesman Lee Poston is not calling these vehicles drones, because he doesn’t want people to confuse them with the military kind. According to Poston, they are “sophisticated radio-controlled devices like hobbyists use” that can be “controlled from your iPad or other device.” But the WWF website does call them “conservation drones.”

Prior to receiving the Google grant, the WWF had already deployed trackers in Nepal’s national parks. These drones are light enough to be launched by hand and can be programmed to fly about 18 miles at a maximum elevation of 650 feet, for almost an hour. The cameras on the drones allow rangers on the ground to spot would-be poachers, especially in hard-to-reach places.

The Google funding will enable WWF to expand its drone program in Asia and Africa to protect rhinos, which are hunted for their horns; elephants, which are pursued for their tusks, and tigers, which are killed for everything from their eyes to their reproductive organs. The grant will also be used to advance wildlife tagging technology, specialized sensors, and ranger monitoring software.

 

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About Puru Timalsena

Puru's vast knowledge and boundless enthusiasm in the Tourism field has enabled him to create such a successful trekking profile. He has successfully accomplished numerous Trekking and Mountaineering training courses. He explores different parts of the country, and enjoys introducing new routes to the clients who travel with his team. He runs a leading Trekking Agency in Nepal and frequently shares his experiences and thoughts here in the blog.
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